Plaza de Cort and Hotel Cort

Plaza de Cort

Plaza de Cort is a square in the center of Palma de Mallorca. One of my absolute favorite squares filled with cozy restaurants and small stores. Plaza de Cort is a famous square in Palma – mostly known for two things. Firstly, Palma’s Baroque-era city court, Consell Insular de Mallroca is located here. This is what has given the square its name – since court is cort in Catalan. Secondly, in the middle of the square is also an old, thick and gnarled olive tree, known to be over 800 years old. The olive tree at Plaza de Cort acts as a natural meeting place for Mallorqins, making it the ideal place for visitors who want to uncover the real Palma, far from the many beach resorts.

Plaza de Cort Consell Insular de Mallorca

Hotel Cort

In the center of this square, in the historic and increasingly cosmopolitan city of Palma is Hotel Cort located. A beautiful, small and boutique hotel where the guests will find themselves in 16 gorgeous rooms and suites designed the urban archeologist Lázaro Rosa-Violán. Hotel Cort is a mix between the old town life in Palma as well as inspired by its proximity to the sea (the closest beach is only a fifteen-minute walk through the old town away).

Hotel Cort’s Mallorquin restaurant also makes it easy for the guests to mingle with locals as well as find new acquaintances in tourists and Palma lovers, dogs and the occasional guitarist strolling by where the kids can run free because the square is (almost) car-free.

Hotel Cort Hotel Cort’s beautiful outdoor seating in the middle of Plaza de Cort

Breakfast at Hotel Cort

One of my favorite times at Hotel Cort is their breakfasts. Hotel Cort serves breakfast, lunch and dinner, at their large and and equally beautiful outdoor seating in the middle of Plaza de Cort. You can sit and ponder for hours while sipping café con leche and freshly squeezed orange juice.

Pictures from turisterna.se and Wikipedia

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2 Comments

  1. hahahaha, as a native Brazilian, this post made me chuckle. I never knew my language was so difficult to understand :) I mean, I know Portuguese relies heavily on nasal sounds, which is kind of complicated for Enlksih-speaging people, but "most mysterious of languages"? that made my day :DAudi, if you're interested in Brazilian music (especially old stuff, which I love), let me know, and I'll introduce you to some of my favorites.um beijo!

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